St Paul the Traveller and Roman Citizen

The following public domain book is now available for free download in PDF:

William M. Ramsay, St Paul the Traveller and Roman Citizen. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1895. Hbk. pp.394.

St Paul

Chapter I.

The Acts of the Apostles

I. Trustworthiness. The aim of our work is to treat its subject as a department of history and of literature. Christianity was not merely a religion, but also a system of life and action; and its introduction by Paul amid the society of the Roman Empire produced changes of momentous consequence, which the historian must study. What does the student of Roman history find in the subject of our investigation? How would an observant, educated, and unprejudiced citizen of the Roman Empire have regarded that new social force, that new philosophical system, if he had studied it with the eyes and the temper of a nineteenth century investigator?
As a preliminary the historian of Rome must make up his mind about the trustworthiness of the authorities. Those which we shall use are: (1) a work of history commonly entitled the Acts of the Apostles (the title does not originate from the author), (2) certain Epistles purporting to be written by Paul. Of the latter we make only slight and incidental use; and probably even those who dispute their authenticity would admit that the facts we use are trustworthy, as being the settled belief of the Church at a very early period. It is, therefore, unnecessary to touch on the authenticity of the Epistles; but the question as to the date the composition, and the author of the Acts must be discussed. If the main position of this book is admitted, it will furnish a secure basis for the Epistles to rest on.

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Francis Lyall on Roman Law in the Writings of Paul

The following article is now available on-line in PDF.

Francis Lyall, “Roman Law in the Writings of Paul – Aliens and Citizens,” Evangelical Quarterly 48.1 (Jan.-Mar. 1976): 3-14.

My thanks to Professor Lyall for his kind permission. The themes explored in this article are developed more fully in Francis Lyall, Slaves, Citizens, Sons. Legal Metaphors in the Epistles. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1984. Pbk. ISBN: 0310451914. pp.288.

Reformed Baptist Theological Review Table of Contents Online

I have created a table of contents for the Reformed Baptist Theological Review here. The journal states its Purpose and Goal as follows:

The purpose of RBTR is to be an instrument for the theological advance of confessional Reformed Baptist pastors, but also for the benefit of believers of different theological commitments. RBTR will seek to present material in a scholarly, yet pastoral manner.

The goal is to present confessional Reformed Baptist doctrine in all the branches of theology, with its practical outworking. With Scripture as the ultimate standard. RBTR will function within the theological framework of the 2nd London Confession of Faith (1677/1689).

The editor, Dr Richard C. Barcellos, has kindly granted permission for me to host three articles on the New Perspective on Paul, which I am sure many will find helpful.

Jeffery Smith, “An Overview and Critique of the New Perspective (Part I),” Reformed Baptist Theological Review 3.1 (Jan. 2006): 77-108.

Jeffery Smith, “An Overview and Critique of the New Perspective on Paul’s Doctrine of Justification: Part Two – the New Perspective Critiqued (1),” Reformed Baptist Theological Review 3.2 (July 2006): 118-133.

Jeffery Smith, “An Overview and Critique of the New Perspective on Paul’s Doctrine of Justification: Part Three – The New Perspective Critiqued (2),” Reformed Baptist Theological Review 4.1 (January 2007): 91-119.