“Interpreting the Word of God: FS for Steven Barabas.” One chapter to go on-line – please help to choose which one

One of my supporters kindly sent me a copy of the following book in the hope that I would be able to place one chapter from it on-line:

 

Samuel J. Schultz & Morris A. Inch, eds., Interpreting the Word of God. Festschift in honor of Steven Barabas. Chicago: Moody Press, 1976. Hbk. pp.281.

 

Moody have kindly given me permission for me to do this, but there remains the problem of deciding which article to use, as all are on interesting subjects. So I am asking my readers to vote for the chapter they would most like to see on-line. Anyone can vote, but I will give extra weighting to those who have read the article and can say why it is still useful today. I look forward to reading the comments. Here is the list of articles:

J.E. Jennings, “Ancient Near Eastern Religion and Biblical Interpretation,” 11-30.

Alfred J. Hoerth, “Archaeology and the Christian Mind,” 31-45.

S.J. Schultz, “Old Testament Prophets in Today’s World,” 46-59.

C. Hassell Bullock, “Entrée to the Pentateuch Through the Prophets: A Hermeneutics of History,” 60-77.

Donald A. Hagner, “The Old Testament in the New Testament,” 78-104.

Gordon Fee, “The Genre of New Testament Literature and Biblical Hermeneutics,” 105-127.

Alan Johnson, “History and Culture in New Testament Interpretation,” 128-161.

Morris Inch, “The Place of the Incarnation in Biblical Interpretation,” 162-177.

Donald Lake, “The Reformation Contribution to the Interpretation of the Bible,” 178-198.

Robert Webber, “Biblical Authority: A Study in History,” 199-216.

Herbert Jacobson, “On the Limitations of Hermeneutics,” 217-237.

Steven Barabas, “Bibliographic Tools of Biblical Interpretation,” 238-272.

Leon Morris on Apocalyptic

The following book is now available on-line in PDF:

Leon Morris, Apocalyptic, 2nd edn. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans / Leicester: IVP, 1973. Pbk. ISBN: 0851113125. pp.128.

Thanks to the kind permission of the Leon & Mildred Morris Foundation I am pleased to be able to rescue this helpful little book from obscurity and make it available to a new generation of students. As Leon Morris writes in his preface:

This little book is not meant to be a profound or original contribution to a difficult subject. It is written out of two convictions: the one, that apocalyptic is an important part of the background of the New Testament, the other, that it is not well understood by the average student. Indeed, I fear that the average student would be hard put to it to give more than one or two characteristics of this kind of literature. I have written accordingly to help him get the picture. Recog­nizing that experts in apocalyptic differ widely among them­selves and that there are many points of uncertainty, I have tried to show what are the generally held opinions and what are the controverted areas. This then is simply an intro­duction to a very important but little understood part of the background of the New Testament.