How to Study the English Bible by R.B. Girdlestone

Robert Baker Girdlestone [1836-1923], How to Study the English BibleThis little book was written to help new Christians understand how to read the Bible by Robert Baker Girdlestone [1836-1923], the first Principal of Wycliffe Hall in Oxford. As such it remains of enduring value. This title is in the public domain.

Robert Baker Girdlestone [1836-1923], How to Study the English Bible. London: The Religious Tract Society, 1887. Hbk. pp.112. [Click to visit the main download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  1. A Description of the English Bible
  2. The Bible the Word of God
  3. The Bible Demands Study
  4. Rules for Studying the Bible
  5. Hints on Special Books
  6. The Study of Doctrine
  7. The Practical and Devotional Use of the Bible
  8. Method and Order of Reading the Bible
  9. Useful and Order of Reading the Bible
  • Index of Subjects
  • Index of Texts

Preface

This little book is intended to supply a need felt by many students of God’s Word. They have taken in the message of salvation, they have dedicated their lives to the Master, and have said to Him, ‘Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?’ The answer to this question lies in the Scriptures, and they have begun to read their Bible in order to learn the will of God. But they soon feel that there are two ways of reading, – a right and a wrong way; and they look out for some practical guidance which may enable them to make the best of God’s Word.

The following pages are offered with a view of meeting this desire.

May God bless them to the reader’s use!

For more resources on how to read the Bible, please go here.

Biblical Interpretation by Edwin Cyril Blackman

Edwin Cyril Blackman, Biblical Interpretation. The Old Difficulties and the New OpportunityThis book on biblical interpretation deals with the issue of biblical authority and surveys the history of biblical interpretation. According to the blurb on the dustjacket the author “…shows the Bible is still the Word of God for mankind, and the work of the scholars enables it to be more easily understood and proclaimed by this generation”. Edwin Cyril Blackman is perhaps best known for his classic work Marcion and His Influence (SPCK, 1948).

This book is still in copyright. Permission to reproduce it on-line has been granted by E.C. Blackman’s family and the United Reformed Church. It can be used for educational purposes, but not sold for profit without permission from the copyright holders.

Edwin Cyril Blackman, Biblical Interpretation. The Old Difficulties and the New Opportunity. London: Independent Press Ltd., 1957. Hbk. pp.212. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
    1. Introductory
    2. The Question of Authority
    3. The Development of Exegesis
    4. Modern Criticism
    5. The Present Task in Biblical Interpretation
  • Index

Preface

The aim of this book is to serve ‘the cause of true exposition. The three longer chapters IV-VI are more obviously related to that purpose than the others. Chapter IV is historical, and tries to give an impression of how Christian teachers and preachers through nineteen centuries have in fact expounded the Bible. Chapter VI is intended to be a climax in that it ventures to lay down canons of exegesis for the preacher today. It seemed advisable to preface these larger chapters with some discussion of issues about which it is essential for the preacher to have a right judgment: the significance of the Bible as Revelation, the authority of the Bible in the setting of the general problem of moral and spiritual authority, and the function and limits of historical criticism as applied to the Bible….

For more resources on biblical hermeneutics click here.

New Testament Interpretation: Essays on Principles and Methods

Essays on New Testament Interpretation
Essays on New Testament Interpretation

In 1977 Howard Marshall edited a collection of essays on New Testament interpretation contributed by some of the best Evangelical scholars in the UK, many of whom have since gone to their reward, including Marshall himself. The volume has proved to be of enduring value to students, particularly F.F Bruce’s masterful summary of the history of New Testament study. All of the essays are available for free download, thanks to the kind permission of Paternoster Press. Click on the individual articles to download.

I. Howard Marshall, ed. New Testament Interpretation: Essays on Principles and Methods. Carlisle: The Paternoster Press, 1977, revised 1979, 1985. Pbk. pp.406.

Contents

Editor’s Foreword

Introduction – I. Howard Marshall

Part I – The Background To Interpretation II

The History of New Testament Study – F.F. Bruce

Presuppositions in New Testament Criticism – Graham N. Stanton

Part II – The Use of Critical Methods in Interpretation

Semantics and New Testament Interpretation – Anthony C. Thiselton

Questions of Introduction – Donald Guthrie

The Religious Background – John W. Drane

Historical Criticism – I. Howard Marshall

Source Criticism – David Wenham

Form Criticism – Stephen H. Travis

Tradition History – David R. Catchpole

Redaction Criticism – Stephen S. Smalley

Part III – The Task of Exegesis XII

How the New Testament Uses the Old – E. Earle Ellis

Approaches To New Testament Exegesis – Ralph P. Martin

Exegesis in Practice: Two Examples – R.T. France

Demythologising – The Problem of Myth in the New Testament – James D.G. Dunn

The New Hermeneutic – Anthony C. Thiselton

The Authority of the New Testament – Robin Nixon

Expounding the New Testament – John Goldingay

Bibliography

Indexes