Leon Morris on Apocalyptic

The following book is now available on-line in PDF:

Leon Morris, Apocalyptic, 2nd edn. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans / Leicester: IVP, 1973. Pbk. ISBN: 0851113125. pp.128.

Thanks to the kind permission of the Leon & Mildred Morris Foundation I am pleased to be able to rescue this helpful little book from obscurity and make it available to a new generation of students. As Leon Morris writes in his preface:

This little book is not meant to be a profound or original contribution to a difficult subject. It is written out of two convictions: the one, that apocalyptic is an important part of the background of the New Testament, the other, that it is not well understood by the average student. Indeed, I fear that the average student would be hard put to it to give more than one or two characteristics of this kind of literature. I have written accordingly to help him get the picture. Recog­nizing that experts in apocalyptic differ widely among them­selves and that there are many points of uncertainty, I have tried to show what are the generally held opinions and what are the controverted areas. This then is simply an intro­duction to a very important but little understood part of the background of the New Testament.

Tiny tablet provides proof for the accuracy of the Old Testament

Personally I don’t have any doubts that the Bible provides an accurate historical record of the people and events it describes. Even so, it is nice when someone comes up with yet another piece of hard evidence for this. The evidence doesn’t get any “harder” than than the 2,500 clay tablet discovered recently in the collection of the British Museum. This tablet is a receipt from one of the temples of Babylon to Nabu-sharrussu-ukin “chief eunuch” of Nebuchadnezzar. According to a recent article in The Daily Telegraph It is almost certain that this is the same person as is mentioned in Jeremiah 32:3:

Then all the officials of the king of Babylon came and took seats in the Middle Gate: Nergal-Sharezer of Samgar, Nebo-Sarsekim a chief officer, Nergal-Sharezer a high official and all the other officials of the king of Babylon. [NIV]

The find is being hailed as the most important find in Biblical Archaology for 100 years, Prof. Irving Finkel of the British Museum is quoted as saying:

This is a fantastic discovery, a world-class find, … If Nebo-Sarsekim existed, which other lesser figures in the Old Testament existed? A throwaway detail in the Old Testament turns out to be accurate and true. I think that it means that the whole of the narrative [of Jeremiah] takes on a new kind of power.

A writer who set out to write about the fall of Jerusalem might be expected to know the name of the Babylonian king that captured the city, but such secondary details demonstrate that the book is, as it claims, a contemporary eyewitness account.

Dr T C Mitchell on the Instruments in Nebuchadnezzar’s Orchestra now online

More quickly than I hoped:

T.C. Mitchell & R. Joyce, “The Musical Instruments in Nebuchadnezzar’s Orchestra,” Notes on Some Problems in the Book of Daniel. London: The Tyndale Press, 1965. pp. 19-27.

is now available. This completes the small volume Notes on Some Problems in the Book of Daniel, which I have wanted for many years to put on-line.