Latest Issue of Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology available

Evangelical Association of the Caribbean

BiblicalStudies.org.uk serves as the on-line home for the Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology. CJET is the academic journal of Caribbean Evangelical Theological Association, Jamaica Theological Seminary and Caribbean Graduate School of Theology. I am very pleased to announce that Volume 16 (2017) is now available for here for free download in PDF.

Vol. 16 (2017) Table of Contents

Julie-Ann Dowding, “1 Corinthians 6: 9-11 As A Caribbean Response To The Homosexual Agenda,” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 1-26.

Zifus James, “The Reception of the Sermon on The Mount in a Caribbean Context: Matthew 5:4,” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 29-51.

Teddy Jones, “A Caribbean Theology of the Environment (Part 2),” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 52-80.

Paul Hemmings, “The Relevance of Systematic Theology For Ministry in the Caribbean,” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 81-98.

Dionne Lindo-Witter, “Book Review: Biblical Exegesis In The Apostolic Period (Richard N Longenecker),” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 99-104.

Andre Scarlett, “A Theodicy Concerning Caribbean Slavery: Towards A Theology Of Black Identity (Part 1),” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 105-131.

Delano V. Palmer, “Romans 7 Once Again,” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 16 (2016): 132-164.

Click here to visit the volume 16 download page and explore the contents of the earlier volumes.

New Book on Revelation by Dr Pieter Lalleman

Dr Pieter LallemanDr Pieter Lalleman, Tutor in Biblical Studies at Spurgeons College in London, has written 10 studies on Book of the Revelation. Pieter writes:

The Book of Revelation is not as inscrutable as many think.  I have written a series of ten studies on the more accessible parts of Revelation, with special attention to the connections of these passages with the Old Testament.

The Lion and the Lamb by Pieter LallemanI do address the question of the situation of the first readers, but my book has no scholarly pretensions.  It is meant for use in church groups, although it will of course also benefit individual readers.  It contains questions for reflection and discussion which help to see how relevant John’s message – which is Jesus’s message – is for today’s church.  Whatever the Book may say about the future, it has enormous relevance for us!  More details and the option to order a copy here.

The publishers description reads:

The book of Revelation is first and foremost a letter addressed to seven churches in Asia Minor (modern day Turkey). Like any normal letter the book contains references to the situation of the readers. As later readers we look over the shoulders of the original readers into a correspondence which initially was not directed to us.

Yet Revelation is also a prophetic book. John himself makes this claim in 1:3 and 22:7, 10, 18 and 19; in 10:11 his work is called prophesying. But what is prophecy in the Bible? People such as Elijah, Isaiah and Jeremiah were messengers of God who spoke his word to their contemporaries. God gave them spiritual insight into their time so that they could shine God’s light on it. They knew God’s precepts and applied these to the situation. Prophets warned people if they were not living as God wanted, but on the other hand they encouraged positive developments. Prophets pointed people to the consequences of their behaviour and in that context they also spoke about the future.

Jewish and Christian prophecy is thus not primarily a form of prediction of the future. It was first and foremost relevant for those who were being addressed; it confronted them with God’s opinion of their situation, with his hopes, his promises, and sometimes also with his judgement in case they would not listen. But when they repented, God adapted his plans, as we see in the book of Jonah. We will approach Revelation in the same way in which we handle all prophecy: by asking what kind of situation is in view and what was expected of the first hearers. Subsequently we will raise the question how this might be relevant to us in the twenty-first century.

Revelation is a letter and a prophecy, but it is also an apocalyptic book. The Greek word for ‘revelation’ in 1:1 is ‘apocalypse’. We often use this word in such expressions as ‘an apocalyptic event’, but we must be careful that our modern language does not hinder our understanding of the Bible. Apocalyptic texts are books which claim to contain revelations about the heavenly world and/or about the future, but not necessarily about disasters. And they challenge us to check our behaviour.

The studies in this book discuss the more readily accessible parts of Revelation, with special attention to the connections of these passages with the Old Testament.

Dr Lalleman is available for interviews about his book and can be contacted via Spurgeon’s College.

Blunt’s Undesigned Coincidences on-line

J.J. Blunt: Undesigned Coincidences
J.J. Blunt: Undesigned Coincidences

J.J. Blunt’s classic work Undesigned Coincidences in the Writings of the Old and New Testament, an Argument of Their Veracity is now available on-line in PDF.

Click here to download.

” When I first read through the Gospels forensically, comparing those places where two or more gospels writers were describing the same event, I was immediately struck by the inadvertent support that each writer provided for the other…. When one gospel eyewitness described an event and left out a detail that raised a question, this question was unintentionally answered by another gospel writer (who, by the way, often left out a detail that was provided by the first gospel writer)….

As someone new to the Bible, I began to investigate whether or not anyone else had observed this phenomenon and found that a professor of divinity name J.J.Blunt wrote a book in 1847 entitled Undesigned Coincidences… This was one of the  first books about the Bible I ever purchased. In his section related to the Gospels and the Boo of Acts, Blunt identified the very same inadvertent parallel passages I discovered when examining the Gospels forensically. Blunt described the phenomenon as a series of “undesigned coincidences” and identified over forty locations in the New Testament where this feature of unintentional eyewitness support could be seen on the pages of Scripture. “

J. Warner Wallace, Cold Case Christianity. A homicide Detective Investigates the Claims of the Gospels. Colorado Springs, CO:  David C. Cook, 2013. pp.184-185.

With such a recommendation I am very pleased to be able to make this book available.