Commentary on the Gospel of Luke by F.W. Farrar

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Gospel According to Luke with Maps, Notes and IntroductionThis is another of the Cambridge Bible for Schools series, a commentary on the Gospel of Luke by F.W. Farrar. My thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Frederic William Farrar [1831-1903], The Gospel According to Luke with Maps, Notes and Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1888. Hbk. pp.392. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

I. Introduction

  1. The Gospels
  2. Life of St John
  3. Authenticity of the Gospel
  4. Characteristics of the Gospel
  5. Analysis of the Gospel; Chief Uncial MSS. of the Gospels; The Herods

II. Text and Notes

III. Excursus I-VII

IV. Index

Introduction, Chapter 1

The word Gospel is the Saxon translation of the Greek Euangelion. In early Greek (e.g. in Homer) this word meant the reward given to one who brought good tidings. In Attic Greek it also meant a sacrifice for good tidings but was always used in the plural euangelia. In later Greek, as in Plutarch and Lucian, euangeli’on meant the good news actually delivered. Among all Greek-speaking Christians the word was naturally adopted to describe the best and gladdest tidings ever delivered to the human race, the good news of the Kingdom of God. In the address of the Angel to the shepherds we find the words “I bring you good tidings of great joy,” where the verb used is euangelizomai. From this Greek word are derived the French Evangile, the Italian Evangelio, the Portuguese Evangelio, &c. Naturally the word which signified “good news” soon came to be used as the title of the books which contained the history of that good news….

Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology Vol 18 (2019) on-line

The Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology is hosted on biblicalstudies.org.uk. The editors have just sent me the latest issue to upload.

Volume 18 (2019)

David Corbin, “A Theology of Joy: An Evangelical Response to Carnival in Trinidad & Tobago,” pp.1-10.

Clinton Chisholm, “Are All Religions Alike?” pp.11-24.

Brendan Bain, “The Future is Now,” pp.25-35.

Anthony Chung, “Reflections on Theological Education,” pp.36-38.

Ricardo O’N Sandcroft, “The Buggary Law in Jamaica,” Caribbean Journal of Evangelical Theology 18 (2019): 39-48.

D.V. Palmer, “Galatians 5 in Context,” pp.49-64.

Marlene Roper, “Book Review: Living Wisely (by Burchell Taylor),” pp.65-66.

Click here to visit the download page for this journal and view the other available issues.

Handley Moule on Romans, Colossians and Philemon

Handley Carr Glyn Moule /ˈmoʊl/ (23 December 1841 – 8 May 1920)
Handley Carr Glyn Moule (23 December 1841 – 8 May 1920). Source: Wikipedia

Handley Moule was Bishop of Durham (1901–1920). He was prolific author and contributed several volumes to the Cambridge Bible for Schools and College series (1891-98). The noted Cambridge theologian C.F.D. Moule was his grand-nephew.

My thanks to Book Aid for providing two of Moule’s commentaries for digitisation. These volumes are in the public domain.

Handley Carr Glyn Moule [1841-1920], editor, The Epistles of Paul the Apostle to the Colossians and Philemon. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1906. Hbk. pp.195. [Click to visit the download page]

Handley Carr Glyn Moule [1841-1920], The Epistles of Paul the Apostle to the Romans. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1918. Hbk. pp.270.  [Click to visit the download page]

Introduction (from Romans Commentary

“Saul, who is also called Paul,” was born at Tarsus, the capital of the province of Cilicia, and one of the three great Academies (Athens, Alexandria, Tarsus,) of the classic world. His father was a Jew, a Benjamite; one of the great orthodox-patriotic party of the Pharisees; a “Hebrew,” in the special sense of a maintainer of Hebrew customs and of the use (within his own household) of the Aramaic language; and, finally, a Roman citizen. This citizenship was no result of the “freedom” of Tarsus; for civic “freedom,” under the Empire, implied no more at the most than municipal self-government and exemption from public taxation. Saul’s father may have been the freedman of a Roman noble; or he may have received citizenship in reward for political services during the great Civil Wars; or, just possibly, he may have bought the privilege….