New Testament for Schools – St Luke – A.R. Witham

Arthur Richard Witham [1863-1930], The Gospel According to Luke. The New Testament For Schools

The New Testament for Schools, St Luke, provides a very basic introduction and commentary on the text of the Revised Version.

My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation. I hope make more of this series available in due course.

Arthur Richard Witham [1863-1930], The Gospel According to Luke. The New Testament For Schools. London: Rivingtons, 1922. Hbk. pp.248. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  • Prefatory note
  • St Luke and His Gospel
  • Palestine and its People
  • Messianic Prophecies
  • Synopsis of St Luke’s Gospel
  • Text of St. Luke in the Revised Version, With Notes
  • Index

St Luke and His Gospel

The Third of the Synoptic Gospels is universally ascribed to St. Luke, the auto.or also of the Acts of the Apostles, and possibly (according to one early conjecture) of the Epistle to the Hebrews. The Greek form of his name, Lucas, is perhaps a diminutive of the Roman name Lucanus. Our knowledge of him is derived almost entirely from a few allusions in the N.T. and from deductions drawn from these.

St. Paul in Colossians iv. 14 (written at Rome during his first imprisonment about A.D. 59 or 60) speaks of Luke as one of those with him who send greetings. His name comes after those who are described as being “of the circumcision,” i.e. Jews by birth, from which we gather that Luke was a Gentile. St. Paul calls him “the beloved physician,” and there are frequent traces in the Gospel and the Acts of Luke’s medical interest and knowledge, and his use of correct medical terminology. In the companion epistle, to Philemon, Luke is again mentioned as “a fellow-worker.” And in St. Paul’s last Epistle, 2 Timothy (iv. 11), Luke appears as the only one of his friends who had remained faithful during the great apostle’s second imprisonment: “only Luke is with me.” From St. Luke’s introduction to the Gospel (see notes, i. 1-4) it is gathered that he had not personally been a follower of Jesus Christ, but had received the faith from others, who had been eyewitnesses. Possibly St. Paul him- self had been the instrument of St. Luke’s conversion, but this is not very probable. But both Scriptures and tradition shew him as the close friend and fellow-worker of St. Paul for many years.

In the record of St. Paul’s travels in the Acts, it is gathered from certain passages where “we” is used instead of “they “; that he joined the apostle at Troas in the course of the second missionary journey (Acts xvi. 10); and again accompanied him to Jerusalem (Acts xx. 6-xxi. 18) and also to Rome, in his voyage and shipwreck and his final arrival (Acts xxvii.xxviii. 16). The use of “we” on the second journey stops at Philippi, and is resumed from that place, on the journey to Jerusalem, from which it seems probable that St. Luke had been left in charge of the newly-founded Church of the Philippians, where he remained for some six years. He has been by many identified with the unnamed “brother whose praise in the Gospel is spread through all the churches” (2 Cor. viii. 18). Possibly also it is he whom St. Paul addresses as “true yokefellow” in writing to the Philippian Church (Phil. iv. 3)…

Pages ix-x

Was Christ Born in Bethlehem? by Sir William Ramsay

Sir William Mitchell Ramsay
Sir William Mitchell Ramsay (Photo Source: Wikipedia)

Sir William M. Ramsay’s classic defence of the historicity of Luke-Acts. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.

William M. Ramsay [1851-1939], Was Christ Born at Bethlehem? A Study on the Credibility of St Luke. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1898. Hbk. pp.280. [Click here to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

  1. Luke’s History: What it Professes to Be
  2. Plan and Unity of Luke’s History
  3. The Attitude of Luke to the Roman Empire
  4. Importance in Luke’s History of the Story of the Birth of Christ
  5. The Question at Issue
  6. Luke’s Account of the Enrolment
  7. Enrolment by Households in Egypt
  8. The Syrian Enrolment of the Year 8 B.C.
  9. The Enrolment of Palestine by Herod the King
  10. Chronology of the Life of Christ
  11. Some Associated Questions
  • Appendix

Preface

Understanding that a certain criticism implied a sort of challenge to apply my theory of Luke’s character as a historian to the Gospel, I took what is generally acknowledged to be the most doubtful passage, from the historian’s view, in the New Testament, Luke ii. 1-4. Many would not even call it doubtful. Strauss (in his New Life of Jesus) and Renan dismiss it in a short footnote as unworthy even of mention in the text.

This passage, interpreted according to the view which I have maintained – that Luke was a great historian, and that he appreciated the force of the Greek superlative (in spite of the contradiction of Professor Blass and others) – gave the result that Luke was acquainted with a system of Periodic Enrolments in Syria, and probably in the East generally. I looked for evidence of such a system; and it was offered by recent discoveries in Egypt. The confirmation afforded to Luke was explained in the Expositor, April and June, 1897.

Realising better in subsequent thought the bearings of the Egyptian discovery, I have enlarged these two articles into an argument against the view that Luke sinks, in the accessories of his narrative, below the standard exacted from ordinary historians. At the risk of repeating views already stated in previous works, the second chapter attempts to put clearly the present state of the question as regards the two books of Luke, without expecting others to be familiar with my views already published.

The names of those scholars whose views I contend against are hardly ever mentioned. The scholars of the “destructive” school seem to prefer not to be mentioned, when one differs from them. I have learned much from them; I was once guided by them; I believe that the right understanding of the New Testament has been very greatly advanced by their laudable determination to probe and to understand everything, as is stated on p. 33; but I think their conclusions are to a great extent erroneous. It might, however, be considered disingenuous if I concealed that the weighty authority of Gardthausen, the historian of Augustus, is dead against me, p. 102….

Pages vii-ix

Commentary on the Gospel of Luke by Thomas M. Lindsay

Thomas M. Lindsay [1843-1914], The Gospel According to St. Luke, Chapters I-XII with Introduction, Notes, and Maps

Thomas M. Lindsay’s 2 volume commentary on Luke’s Gospel is part of the Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students series. I recently came across a partial set of these commentaries at Book Aid and will be putting them on-line over the next few weeks. These titles are in the public domain.

Thomas M. Lindsay [1843-1914], The Gospel According to St. Luke, Chapters I-XII with Introduction, Notes, and Maps. Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1887. Hbk. pp.171. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Thomas M. Lindsay [1843-1914], The Gospel According to St. Luke, Chapters XIII-End, with Introduction, Notes, and Maps. Handbooks for Bible Classes and Private Students. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1887. Hbk. pp.95. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

  • The Gospel
  • The Gospel of Luke
  • The Writer of the Gospel
  • Its Relation to the other Gospels
  • Characteristics of Luke’s Gospel
  • When, where, and for whom written
  • Analysis of the Gospel
  • The Land of Palestine during our Lord’s Ministry
  • The Journeys of Jesus
  • The Jews of the Dispersion
  • Note I. Miracles and Parables recorded by Luke
  • Note II. Genealogical Table of the Herod Family

The Commentary