Journal of Theological Studies articles on-line

The biblicalstudies.org.uk website now hosts over 950 public domain articles from the old series of the Journal of Theological Studies. All of these are now available for free download in pdf. Digitising them has taken some time as it was first necessary to find the date of decease of each author. Those articles whose authors died before 1945 are now considered Public domain, plus anonymous articles published before 1945. I hope that they prove of interest.

You can visit the table of Contents here.

Journal of Theological Studies
Journal of Theological Studies (old series)

James Orr’s The Problem of the Old Testament

James Orr (1844–6th September 1913)
James Orr (1844–6th Sept. 1913) [Source:  Wikipedia]
The following public domain book is now available for free download in PDF:

James Orr, The Problem of the Old Testament Considered with Reference to Recent Criticism. London: James Nesbit & Co. Ltd., 1906. Hbk. pp.562.

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James Orr, The Problem of the Old Testament

Contents

I. Introductory: The Problem Stated

II. The Old Testament From its Own Point of View

III. The Old Testament as Affected by Criticism – I. The History: Argument from Critical Premises

IV. The Old Testament as Affected by Criticism – I. The History: Counter-Theories Tested

V. The Old Testament as Affected by Criticism – II. Religion and Institutions: God and His Worship

VI. The Old Testament as Affected by Criticism – II. Religion and Institutions: Ark, Tabernacle, Priesthood, etc.

VII. Difficulties and Perplexities of the Critical Hyposthesis: I. The JE Analysis

VIII. Difficulties and Perplexities of the Critical Hyposthesis: The Question of Deuteronomy

IX. Difficulties and Perplexities of the Critical Hyposthesis: The Priestly Writing. I. The Code

X. Difficulties and Perplexities of the Critical Hyposthesis: The Priestly Writing. I. The Document

XI. Archaeology and the Old Testament

XII. Psalms and Prophets: The Progressiveness of Revelation

Notes

Indexes

ICC 1 Corinthians Commentary online

The following public domain book is now available for free download in PDF:

Archibald Robertson [1853-1931] & Alfred Plummer [1841-1926], A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the First Epistle of Paul to the Corinthians, 2nd edn. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1914. Hbk. pp.424.

International Critical Commentary on 1 Corinthians

§ I. Corinth

What we know from other sources respecting Corinth in St Paul’s day harmonizes well with the impression which we receive from 1 Corinthians. The extinction of the totius Graeciae lumen, as Cicero (Pro lege Manil. 5) calls the old Greek city of Corinth, by the Roman consul L. Mummius Achaicus, 146 B.C., was only temporary. Exactly a century later Julius Caesar founded anew city on the old site as Colonia Julia Corinthus. The re-building was a measure of military precaution, and little was done to show that there was any wish to revive the glories of Greece (Finlay, Greece under the Romans, p. 67). The inhabitants of the new city were not Greeks but Italians, Caesar’s veterans and freedmen. The descendants of the inhabitants who had survived the destruction of the old city did not return to the home of their parents, and Greeks generally were for a time somewhat shy of taking up their abode in the new city. Plutarch, who was still a boy when St Paul was in Greece, seems hardly to have regarded the new Corinth as a Greek town. Festus says that the colonists were called Corinthienses, to distinguish them from the old Corinthii. But such distinctions do not seem to have been maintained. By the time that St Paul visited the city there were plenty of Greeks among the inhabitants, the current language was in the main Greek, and the descendants of the first Italian colonists had become to a large extent Hellenized.

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