A Cadbury Selection from JBL

[dropcap]R[/dropcap]ecently I was reading through John Nolland’s commentary on the Gospel of Luke when I came across the following passage.

A number of scholars have attempted to support Lukan authorship on the basis of a claim that the medical background of the author was evident in his writing. The argument takes its rise from the study of Hobart (The Medical Language of St. Luke) published in 1882. Hobart compared the language and style of Luke with that of ancient medical writing in Greek and found many similarities. The argument is not finally persuasive because Hobart focused on the distinctiveness of Luke over against Mark but failed to take any benchmarks from other literature of the period of a nonmedical nature. What distinguishes Luke from Mark is a use of language that is slightly more literary. As Cadbury has demonstrated (The Style and Literary Method of Luke, 50-51; ]BL 52 [1933] 55-65), we may find the same sort of language use in the LXX, in the works of ancient Greek veterinarians, and indeed we should expect to find it in any reasonably large body of literature written by a well-educated Greek writer with some modest literary pretension for what he IS wanting. Luke’s writing is certainly consistent with experience as a physician, but it cannot be claimed that only a physician would write as Luke does.{1}

I found it interesting that Nolland, writing in 1989 cited an article by H.J. Cadbury written in 1933. Reading on I found many other references to articles by Cadbury, which made me think that it might be a good idea to make these articles more widely available. I contacted the Director of SBL Press at the Society of Biblical Literature who was enthusiastic about the idea. The librarians at Tyndale House, Dr. Williams’s Library and Heythrop College also gave their willing assistance in providing photocopies and scans. Thanks to all of them I can now make the complete of collection H.J. Cadbury articles from the Journal of Biblical Literature available for free download in PDF.

H.J. Cadbury Collection

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “The basis of early Christian antimilitarism,” Journal of Biblical Literature 37.1-2 (Mar.-June 1918): 66-94.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “The relative pronouns in Acts and elsewhere,” Journal of Biblical Literature 42.3-4 (1923): 150-157.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Lexical notes on Luke-Acts. I,” Journal of Biblical Literature 44.3-4 (1925): 214-227.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Lexical notes on Luke-Acts. II, Recent arguments for medical language,” Journal of Biblical Literature 45.1-2 (1926): 190-209.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Lexical notes on Luke-Acts. III, Luke’s interest in lodging,” Journal of Biblical Literature 45.3-4 (1926): 305-322.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “The odor of the spirit at Pentecost,” Journal of Biblical Literature 47.3-4 (1928): 237-256.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Lexical notes on Luke-Acts. 4, On direct quotation, with some uses of oti and ei,” Journal of Biblical Literature 48.3-4 (1929): 412-425.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Erastus of Corinth,” Journal of Biblical Literature 50.2 (1931): 42-58.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Lexical notes on Luke-Acts. 5, Luke and the horse-doctors,” Journal of Biblical Literature 52.1 (1933): 55-65.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “The Macellum of Corinth,” Journal of Biblical Literature 53.2 (1934): 134-141.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Motives of biblical scholarship,” Journal of Biblical Literature 56.1 (1937): 1-16.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “The meaning of John 20:23, Matthew 16:19, and Matthew 18:18,” Journal of Biblical Literature 58.3 (1939): 251-254.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “A proper name for Dives,” Journal of Biblical Literature 81.4 (Dec. 1962): 399-402.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Some Lukan expressions of time,” Journal of Biblical Literature 82.3 (Sept. 1963): 272-278.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Gospel study and our image of early Christianity,” Journal of Biblical Literature 83.2 (June 1964): 139-145.

Henry Joel Cadbury [1883-1974], “Name for Dives,” Journal of Biblical Literature 84.1 (March 1965): 73.

More articles from the Journal of Biblical Literature can be found here.

{1] John Nolland, “Luke 1-9:20,” Word Biblical Commentary,Vol. 35a. Dallas, TX: Word Books, 1989. pp.xxxvi-xxxvii.

John Calvin on the Catholic Epistles

John Calvin, author of Commentaries on the Catholic Epistles
John Calvin [1509-1564]
John Calvin’s commentaries on the 1 John, 1 & 2 Peter, James and Jude are now available for free download in PDF:

John Calvin (John Owen translator), Commentaries on the Catholic Epistles. Edinburgh: Calvin Translation Society, 1855. Hbk. pp.488.

Commentaries on the First Epistle of Peter

The Argument

The design of Peter in this Epistle is to exhort the faithful to a denial of the world and a contempt of it, so that being freed from carnal affections and all earthly hindrances, they might with their whole soul aspire after the celestial kingdom of Christ, that being elevated by hope, supported by patience, and fortified by courage and perseverance, they might overcome all kinds of temptations, and pursue this course and practice throughout life.

Hence at the very beginning he proclaims in express words the grace of God made known to us in Christ; and at the same time he adds, that it is received by faith and possessed by hope, so that the godly might raise up their minds and hearts above the world. Hence he exhorts them to holiness, lest they should render void the price by which they were redeemed, and lest they should suffer the incorruptible seed of the Word, by which they had: been regenerated into eternal life, to be destroyed or to die. And as he had said, that they had been born again by God’s Word, he makes mention of their spiritual infancy. Moreover, that their faith might not vacillate or stagger, because they saw that Christ was despised and rejected almost by the whole world, he reminds them that this was only the fulfilment of what had been written of him, that he would be the stone of stumbling. But he further teaches them that he would be a firm foundation to those who believe in him. Hence he again refers to the great honour to which God had raised them, that they might be animated by the contemplation of their former state, and by the perception of their present benefits, to devote themselves to a godly life.

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Kirkpatrick’s Commentaries on Samuel

Frontispiece map to Kirkpatrick's Commentaries on 1 & 2 SamuelCommentaries on Samuel

The following public domain commentaries on Samuel are now available for free download in PDF. The frontispiece map included in both volumes is very useful, so I have included scans at various resolutions here.

A.F. Kirkpatrick, ed., The First Book of Samuel with Notes and Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1918. Hbk. pp.251.

Table of Contents

I. Introduction:

Chapter I. The Book of Samuel

Chapter II. Analysis of the First Book of Samuel

Chapter III. Chronology of the Book

Chapter IV. The Place of the Books of Samuel in the History of the Kingdom of God

Chapter V. The Life and Work of Samuel

Chapter VI. The Prophetic Order

Chapter VII. Saul

Chapter VIII. David

II. Text and Notes

III. Additional Notes I-VIII

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A.F. Kirkpatrick, ed., The Second Book of Samuel with Notes and Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1919. Hbk. pp.248.

Table of Contents

I. Introduction:

Chapter I. The Book of Samuel

Chapter II. Analysis of the Second Book of Samuel

Chapter III. The Relation of the Book of Chronicles to the Book of Samuel

Chapter IV. The Chronology of the Book of Samuel

Chapter V. The Place of the Books of Samuel in the History of the Kingdom of God

Chapter VI. The Reign of David

Chapter VII. The Typical Significance of David’s Reign and Life

Chapter VIII. Psalms Illustrative of David’s Reign

II. Text and Notes

III. Additional Notes I-VI

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