Introduction to Ezra by Frank Marshall

Map of Jerusalem to Illustrate the Book of Ezra by Frank MarshallThe Rev Frank Marshall is better known today for his role as a rugby football referee than as a theologian. Nevertheless this slim little volume, written to prepare students preparing for their Oxford and Cambridge exams, provides a very helpful introduction to the book of Ezra. It also includes four useful colour maps. This title is in the public domain.

Frank Marshall [1848-1906], The Old Testament: Ezra. London: George Gill & Sons, n.d. Hbk. pp.52. [Click to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Introduction to the Book of Ezra
  • The Book of Ezra with Marginal and Foot notes
  • Comments on the Revised Version
  • Glossary
  • Appendix
  • Tables of Events in Ezra

Preface

The Book of Ezra is one of a series of manuals on the books of the Old Testament which are primarily intended for the use of Students preparing for the Local Examinations of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge.

The Introduction treats fully of the several subjects with which the Student should be acquainted, comprising full Geographical and Biographical Notes, historical references to the ancient monarchies of the Eastern world, and other important details, which are clearly set forth in the Table of Contents.

The chief alterations of the Revised Version are pointed out in footnotes, the Student being referred to the Revised Version.

In the Appendix will be found (1) a Commentary upon the most important differences between the Authorized and Revised Versions, the alterations being pointed out and explanations given of the reasons for the change ; (2) a Glossary of words and phrases, thus avoiding constant reference to the text and notes…

For more resources on the Book of Ezra visit this page

M’Clymont’s Introduction to the New Testament and its Writers on-line

James Alexander M’Clymont [1848-1927] provides a substantial introduction to the New Testament. I found it interesting that the author makes frequent references to J.J. Blunt’s Undesigned Coincidences as positive evidence of the New Testament’s historical accuracy and truthfulness. If you want to download Blunt’s book to explore his argument, click here. Thanks to Book Aid for providing a copy of this book for digitisation. This title is in the public domain.

Map Illustrating the Missionary Journeys of the Apostle Paul

James Alexander M’Clymont [1848-1927], The New Testament and Its Writers. Being an Introduction to the Books of the New Testament. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1893. Hbk. pp.288. [Click to visit the download page for this title]

Contents

  • Preface
  1. The New Testament
  2. The Gospels
  3. “The Gospel According to St. Matthew”
  4. “The Gospel According to St. Mark”
  5. “The Gospel According to St. Luke”
  6. “The Gospel According to St. John”
  7. “The Acts of the Apostles”
  8. The Epistles: The Epistles of St. Paul
  9. “The First Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Thessalonians”; “The Second Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Thessalonians”
  10. “The First Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians”
  11. “The Second Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians”
  12. “The Epistle of Paul to the Galatians”
  13. “The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Romans”
  14. The Epistles of the Imprisonment; “The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Philippians”
  15. “The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Colossians”
  16. “The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Ephesians”
  17. The Pastoral Epistles; “The First Epistle of Paul the Apostle to Timothy”
  18. “The Epistle of Paul to Titus”; “The Second Epistle of Paul the Apostle to Timothy”
  19. “The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Hebrews”
  20. The Catholic Epistles; “The General Epistle of James”
  21. “The First Epistle General of Peter”
  22. “The Second Epistle General of Peter”; “The General Epistle of Jude
  23. “The First Epistle General of John”; The Second Epistle of John”; “The Third Epistle of John”
  24. “The Revelation of St. John the Divine”
  • Appendix

Preface

The favourable reception accorded to The New Testament and Its Writers in its original form, as one of the series of Guild and Bible-Class Text-books issued by the Christian Life and Work Committee of the Church of Scotland, has encouraged the author to present it in a form more suitable for general readers. While serving other purposes, he believes it may be specially helpful to ministers and other teachers who are using the small edition in their Bible Classes….

For more New Testament resources go here.

Charles J. Ellicott’s Commentary on the Letters to the Thessalonians

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905]
Portrait of Bishop Charles Ellicott By Herbert R. Barraud (died 1896) – Public Domain. Source: Wikipedia
This is a detailed commentary on the Greek text of Paul’s Letters to the Thessalonians by Biship Charles Ellicott. As such those with a good knowledge of Greek will benefit most from it. This title is in the public domain.

Charles John Ellicott [1819-1905], St. Paul’s Epistles to the Thessalonians: With a critical and Grammatical commentary and a revised translation, 4th edn. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts & Green, 1880. Hbk. pp.167. [Click here to visit the download page]

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the Third Edition
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • 1 Thessalonians
  • 2 Thessalonians

Introduction

This calm, practical, and profoundly consolatory Epistle was written by the Apostle to his converts in the wealthy and populous city of Thessalonica not long after his first visit to Macedonia ( Acts xvi. 9), when in conjunction with Silas and Timothy he laid the foundations of the Thessalonian Church (Acts xvii. 1 sq.). See notes on ch. i. 1.

The exact time of writing the Epistle appears to have been the early months of the Apostle’s year and a half stay at Corinth (Acts xviii. 11), soon after Timothy had joined him (1 Thess. iii. 6) and reported the spiritual state of their converts, into which he had been sent to enquire (eh. iii. 2), probably from Athens; see notes on eh. iii. 1. We may thus consider the close of A.D. 52, or the beginning of A.D. 53, as the probable date, and, if this be correct, must place the Epistle first on the chronological list of the Apostle’s writings….