Journal Digitisation – Your Help Requested

Journals needed for Digitisation

As many of you know I am currently working on the digitisation of theological journals whose older editions are now mostly in the Public Domain – one of which is The Expository Times. Are there any readers of this blog in the UK who have access to issues of this journal who would be willing to either donate or loan them so that I can make the Public Domain articles within them available on-line for free? If you can, please let me know.

You can see current progress on The Expository Times project here.

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Issues of Palestine Exploration Quarterly (1929-1944) and The Bulletin of the John Rylands Library (pre-1945) are also required.

Digitisation of The Expositor

For the last few months I have been giving priority to the digitisation of the Victorian journal, The Expositor. My reasons for this are two-fold.

Firstly, the journal contains hundreds of useful articles by such authors as B.B. Warfield and William R. Ramsay which deserve a wider readership. Secondly, the first eight series took up around twelve feet of shelf-space, and that space is at a premium in our flat.The Expositor journal

So, with the completion of the digitisation is Series 4 this evening, six-feet of shelf-space has been freed, and 1,586 articles – most previously unavailable – are now on-line. Click on the links below to read them.

Series 1 – Vols 1 – 12 (1875-1880)
Series 2 – Vols. 1 – 8 (1881-1884)
Series 3 – Vols. 1 – 10 (1885-1889)
Series 4 – Vols. 1 – 10 (1890-1894)

John Calvin on the Catholic Epistles

John Calvin, author of Commentaries on the Catholic Epistles
John Calvin [1509-1564]
John Calvin’s commentaries on the 1 John, 1 & 2 Peter, James and Jude are now available for free download in PDF:

John Calvin (John Owen translator), Commentaries on the Catholic Epistles. Edinburgh: Calvin Translation Society, 1855. Hbk. pp.488.

Commentaries on the First Epistle of Peter

The Argument

The design of Peter in this Epistle is to exhort the faithful to a denial of the world and a contempt of it, so that being freed from carnal affections and all earthly hindrances, they might with their whole soul aspire after the celestial kingdom of Christ, that being elevated by hope, supported by patience, and fortified by courage and perseverance, they might overcome all kinds of temptations, and pursue this course and practice throughout life.

Hence at the very beginning he proclaims in express words the grace of God made known to us in Christ; and at the same time he adds, that it is received by faith and possessed by hope, so that the godly might raise up their minds and hearts above the world. Hence he exhorts them to holiness, lest they should render void the price by which they were redeemed, and lest they should suffer the incorruptible seed of the Word, by which they had: been regenerated into eternal life, to be destroyed or to die. And as he had said, that they had been born again by God’s Word, he makes mention of their spiritual infancy. Moreover, that their faith might not vacillate or stagger, because they saw that Christ was despised and rejected almost by the whole world, he reminds them that this was only the fulfilment of what had been written of him, that he would be the stone of stumbling. But he further teaches them that he would be a firm foundation to those who believe in him. Hence he again refers to the great honour to which God had raised them, that they might be animated by the contemplation of their former state, and by the perception of their present benefits, to devote themselves to a godly life.

Click here to continue reading.